reggae / ska / calypso

Taj Weekes: A Conscious Party at the Sunset Concert

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Sunset Concerts

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Sharon Clark Tribute: The Sunset Concerts Honor a Local Legend


Who: Taj Weekes and Adowa
What: Sunset Concert Series (reggae)
Where:
When: 2017-07-27
The summer sets on another Sunset when Taj Weekes and Adowa bring socially conscious reggae Thursday
Leah Williams
Video Comentary

The summer sets on another Sunset when Taj Weekes and Adowa bring socially conscious reggae Thursday, July 27 to the Shryock Auditorium steps.

Growing up in the Caribbean, Weekes recalled entertaining at a young age.

“We would all line up in the living room and entertain and sing for my dad,” Weekes told Nightlife. “I sang in school and at church.... I think you are very much the product of the music you grew up with.”

A professional singer since he was ten, Weekes now fronts Adowa, which includes Burt “Rads” Desiree on bass, Wayne “Adoni” Xavier on lead guitar, Jafe Paulino on guitar, John Hewitt and Ayo Kato on keyboards, and Baldwin Brown on drums. Valerie Kelley and Jennifer Schultheis supply background vocals.

Weekes and Adowa released a fifth studio album, Love, Herb, and Reggae, in 2015, a record that featured a mellow assortment of reggae tunes that touch on the humanitarian roots of the genre, yet never seem cliché.

A poet and a social activist, Weekes extends his harmonious humanitarian efforts beyond his song lyrics. He works with the United Nations as a UNICEF Champion for Children and started a children’s charity, They Often Cry Outreach.

Weekes and Adowa started their current, twenty-nine city tour in June. Weekes plans to release a new album this January, and has incorporated many of the new songs into the band’s soundcheck and set list.

Much of the material for the new record, Weekes said, was inspired after seeing the efforts at the Standing Rock Indian Tribe Reservation and the ongoing protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

“The level of love that I saw at Standing Rock kind of overwhelmed me,” Weekes said. “I understand people standing up for family and for friends, but for land that isn’t yours and for people you don’t know, it was incredible.”

Weekes has earned accolades for his smart, socially sentient writing style, maintaining a self-described “unblinking and sophisticated view of the world,” as his press bio states. Weekes explained that the balance between seeing what is and seeking what should be can be mutually understood if humanity is taken into consideration.

“I think love was the kind of influence for the album— love for humans, and lack of love for those who think it’s their right to take it away,” he said.

Weekes said he hopes that the melodic message behind the music will resonate with the audience and help listeners realize the power in united fronts. He quotes one of his lyrics— “You and I have no war, except the war we’re given”— as a universal truth.

“We hope to put out positive vibes,” he said. “Within our shows could be one little spark that could start a fire in one possible place. Not a destructive kind of fire, but if we can look past the bullshit and really see what’s going on, that’s the kind of fire we want to start.”

For more information, check out <https://www.TajWeekes.com>.

who: Taj Weekes and Adowa

what: Sunset Concert Series (reggae)

where: Steps of Shryock Auditorium

when: Thursday, July 27

Version City Tour: Allstar Ska and Reggae at the Sunset Concerts

Venues & Businesses
Sunset Concerts

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Barrence Whitfield: A Rock ‘n’ Roll Fireball Opens the Sunset Concerts


Who: Version City Tour featuring King Django, Brian Hill, John DeCarlo, and Sascha Laue
What: Sunset Concert Series (ska, reggae)
Where:
When: 2017-06-22
Pictured: King Django and Brian Hill.
Leah Williams
Video Comentary

The next Sunset Concert will turn Carbondale into Version City when an allstar reggae, ska, and dancehall tour featuring King Django, Brian Hill, John DeCarlo, and Sascha Laue comes Thursday, June 22 to the Turley Park Gazebo. Afterward, Django will head over to the Hangar 9 to spin reggae and ska records with Adam Fletcher of local band the Copyrights.

Nightlife caught up with Django and Hill while the band was getting breakfast in North Carolina to discuss the tour’s origins and the supergroup’s plans for the future.

Django is a veteran producer, engineer, and performer who served as a sideman for Rancid, Murphy’s Law, and the Toasters. He assembled the Version City recording studio in 1997. Soon, it became the hub of the ska and reggae scene in New York City. In 2001, the studio moved to New Brunswick, New Jersey, where Django continues to engineer and produce recordings for many international clients. He also held the Version City Party at various venues before making it a monthly event in 2006 at the prestigious Knitting Factory in New York City.

In 2012 Django took the Version City party on the road. First supported by a young band called the Snails, Django performed original songs and several classic reggae and ska tunes during the tour.

A second Version City outing ventured out during summer 2013, featuring a compact quartet with Hill, who leads Regatta Sixty-nine on bass and vocals, and DeCarlo, the guitarist and vocalist for Boston ska group Westbound Train. Broadcaster and Royal City Riot drummer Anthony Vito Fraccalvieri rounded out the second incarnation.

Hill said the latest group, which brings aboard Sascha Laue of Foo Fanick and the Butlers, is about the fifth lineup of the Version City Party, and the melding of musicians from different bands into one larger ska/reggae supergroup came from a mutual love for the music and respect for each other as musicians.

“It all kicked off pretty organically,” Hill said. “It’s been like a variety show with different elements every show.” (A video from earlier this year that announced the tour features a slightly different band playing a cover of the Willie Nelson song “On the Road Again.”)

Django said the Version City tours allowed him to play with a wide variety of high-caliber musicians.

“With this group, I’ve got to reconnect with musicians,” he said. “I really enjoy the pedal-steel guitar sound.”

Both Django and Hill said they hope this incarnation of the band will record an album sometime in the near future.

“We have been going into the studio whenever we get the chance,” Hill said.

Hill said ska and reggae is able to resonate with audiences because it has a roots feeling.

“Jamaican music is very earthy,” he said. “It’s down-to-earth and honest. It doesn’t have a lot of pretense. It is what it is.”

Django agreed, adding: “It’s simple to connect with and it’s danceable.”

Hill also said people can relate to reggae and ska because it’s just a more pure form of the popular music they’re used to hearing.

“The vast majority of music today has some trace back to Jamaican music,” he said. “Rap, hip-hop, pop, all of it. Pretty much every decade has been influenced. The eighties had new wave. There was Sublime and No Doubt in the nineties. Even today, you can still hear it in artists like Taylor Swift and Britney Spears.”

For more information, check out <http://www.VersionCity.com> or <https://www.EchoMixArtists.net>.

who: Version City Tour featuring King Django, Brian Hill, John DeCarlo, and Sascha Laue

what: Sunset Concert Series (ska, reggae)

where: Turley Park Gazebo

 

when: Thursday, June 22

Driftaways: Bringing the Drop to Carbondale

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Hangar 9

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Driftaways: Reggae with a Blues Twist


Who: Driftaways
What: reggae
Where:
When: 2017-01-28
For over half a century, infectious drop beats and socially conscious lyrics have combined to bring
Thomas Henry Horan
Video Comentary

For over half a century, infectious drop beats and socially conscious lyrics have combined to bring people together in a special kind of life celebration— a reggae, or workers’ dance party. Luckily, the Driftaways, Saint Louis’s finest seven-piece Jamaican-style orchestra, is returning Saturday, January 28 to the Hangar 9.

Nightlife recently got in riddum wit’ Zaq Nunley, saxophonist and founding member of the Driftaways.

You’ve played in Carbondale before.

Tres Hombres is a great place to play. Plus, they feed us. And let me tell you, with seven guys in the band, that’s a big help. We also love playing at Hangar 9.

Seven white guys. Who happen to play some pretty serious reggae and dub. How did that come to be?

Those of us in the original lineup of the band, guys coming out of high school, started out playing hardcore punk in a band called the Deficit. But gradually we got interested in more complex music, especially third-wave ska. Fishbone had fused punk with ska. I had played saxophone in high school. Sean, who was playing guitar in the band, had played trombone in high school. We added some new guys on different instruments.

But we wanted to play more than just the weed songs and beach-party songs. At that time, these great ska bands were coming out of New Zealand— Fat Freddy’s Drop, the Black Seeds, Katchafire. We got excited by what they were doing, and the more people and different instruments we had, the more fun we had.

You play mostly original songs.

We play a few covers, of course. Classics. But as we’ve grown musically, our songwriting has grown, too.

There is a lot of serious social and political content in some of your lyrics.

Reggae is a lot about what’s going on in people’s lives. We appreciate that, and write about the things that concern us. But we also like to have fun, and we want the audience to have fun. Now that America is great again, I’m sure we’ll have a lot to write about.

What’s more important in your songs— the music, or the lyrics?

That all depends on who writes the song. The person who writes the words thinks the words are more important, and the person who writes the music thinks the music is more important.

Do you get along with each other?

We do. Some of us live together, you know, in a band house. We argue like any other band, but the next thing you know, we’re jamming, and then we’re all in the same groove in no time.

How do you get along with other reggae and ska bands? Any beefs?

Far from it. That’s one of the great things about this music. It’s a real global community.

Like the Irie Vibes Music Festival in North Carolina?

That was a reeeaaallyy long drive, but a really great experience. We love playing festivals. Where else can you get an audience who can’t leave? But seriously, we were so happy to be with other reggae bands and reggae lovers for a whole weekend.

Do you come from a musical family?

Not really. But my parents were always very supportive of my interest in music. I mean, they bought me a saxophone. That was a real investment. So they were like, “You are going to practice.” Now, I have two daughters. They’ve started to play around with the instruments in the house. I asked my oldest daughter if she wanted to join the Driftaways someday. She was like, “No, I’m going to start my own girl band.”

What’s next for the Driftaways?

We’ve been on a roll playing a lot of fun shows and festivals. And we’ve also been writing some new songs. This spring, we are heading into Shock City Studios in Saint Louis and getting started on a new album. So, I’m making an official promise to our fans— a new album by the Driftaways is coming soon!

who: Driftaways

what: reggae

where: Hangar 9

 

when: Saturday, January 28

Jungle Dogs Reunion 2016: Resurrecting Carbondale’s Wildest Years

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Jungle Dogs

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Jungle Dogs

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Venues & Businesses
Copper Dragon, The
Pinch Penny Pub

More Articles
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2013: A Quarter Century of Music, Memories, and Fun
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2014: A Wild Carbondale Party Tradition Continues
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2015: Still Kicking the School Year off With a Real Party
Jungle Dogs Reunion Concert 2012: Together Again for a Party, Nostalgia, and Cold Beer
Jungle Dogs: Returning to Reopen Their Own Back Yard
Jungle Dogs: SIU’s Party-school Image Incarnate


Who: Jungle Dogs reunion show
What: funk, reggae, ska, calypso
Where:
When: 2016-09-03
The Jungle Dogs are back for their much-anticipated annual Labor Day reunion concert Saturday, Septe
Jeff Hale
Video Comentary

The Jungle Dogs are back for their much-anticipated annual Labor Day reunion concert Saturday, September 3 in the Pinch Penny Pub Beer Garden. (The rain location is in the Copper Dragon Brewing Company.)

It’s been almost thirty years since the group came out of the ranks of the SIU School of Music with the goal to make people happy playing music. Originally the plan was to play Cajun music. But the serendipitous mistake of spinning a calypso album at the wrong speed captured the budding band’s attention and heart, and changed the group’s musical direction. It would prove to be a momentous decision, both for the group that would soon christen themselves the Jungle Dogs, and for the audiences that would soon flock to hear them. The group’s music, a red-hot mix of calypso, ska, reggae, and funk, caught on with college audiences like an out of control wildfire, and within a year the Jungle Dogs had built a dedicated fan base that would follow them for the next twenty-eight years.

“I love the Jungle Dogs!” eagerly cries long-time dedicated fan Carol Conley. “I have always loved them! They are one of my favorite memories of my Carbondale days! I’ve ‘jumped up ‘cause I like cold beer’ more times than I can count! Who wouldn’t love that eclectic mix of rock, reggae and calypso funk?”

Conley’s sentiments perfectly describe the adoration that grew between the Jungle Dogs and the scores of fans they drew to live shows during their reign over SIU’s golden party era.

Then, in 2004, growing families and changing career directions led to the band retiring from public performing. After a six-year break, the nine men (saxophone player Klaus “Rock the House” Bank, bass player Eddie Chapa, trombone player Larry Daly, trumpet and keyboard player Keith Huffman, drummer John Hunter, percussionist Matt Linsin, trombone and keyboard player Jim Owens, guitarist Dan Schingel, and trumpet player and frontman D. Ward) who made “Cold Beer” Carbondale’s unofficial anthem came back together for a reunion. Original Dogs fans from the eighties came, some with children (gasp) old enough to enter Pinch and party alongside their parents, and new SIU students exploring the Carbondale scene for the first time had a chance to come out and enjoy a taste of what made Carbondale a party town in the best sense of the word. The Jungle Dogs’ Labor Day reunion has taken place every year since.

Find out more at <http://www.JungleDogs.com>.

Recently, Nightlife had a chance to catch up with original Jungle Dog, guitarist extraordinaire, and tall-tale-teller Dan Schingel for the inside scoop on this year’s show, what it’s like to be a part of such a long-lasting brotherhood, and some exciting new developments for this year’s concert.

It’s hard to believe another year’s gone by and we’re almost ready for another reunion show. Are you excited?

We are definitely looking forward to a big time! This is the sixth year we’ve done a reunion concert. It’s always great, always a lot of fun. This one is especially going to be a lot of fun because we’ve actually got a couple of studio musicians and singers from California coming in to sit in with the band on a few songs to kind of spice up the old Jungle Dogs! [laughing] You know, some of us guys in the band are kind of getting up there in age, and it’s tough to keep singing like a young man, so we’ve brought in a couple of new guys to sing with us. These are big-time California musicians and singers. They’ve sung with Michael Jackson and Don Henley as backup singers.

That’s exciting! How did that come about?

These guys are kind of friends of the band. They were in a band back in the late seventies and early eighties with a couple of guys in our band, and they went on to fame out in California as really good rock ‘n’ roll singers. They are stars in their own right, and we thought it would be a lot of fun to have them sit in on a couple of songs. Without revealing too much, their first names are Darryl and Dorian, and they’re coming in to help us polish out a few things. It’s gonna be great.

For your fans, ranging from the eighties to the present, your music and concerts have given birth to so many great memories. Is it the same way for the guys in the band?

I would definitely say one-hundred percent. To this day, there isn’t one single show that we do that we don’t have multiple people come up to us and tell us about.... There’s nine guys in our band, and at every show, different people come up to every one of us and say, “I remember this,” or “I remember that.” And it’s to the point now that some of them bring their kids along so they can see the stuff that we did. That’s always a lot of fun, too.

One of the legends that has grown out of the reunion concerts is the now-famous practice and jam session you guys do the night before the show. Is that going again this year?

It’s definitely happening on Friday night, in an undisclosed location in Southern Illinois. And of course, there’s always people that find it. And of course, I’ll make a great big pot of gumbo or something equally as good and we all sit around going through the songs. At first we all roll our eyes and say, “Oh, boy,” but then when the pedal hits the metal on Saturday night, something just clicks. It’s always good.

Good is definitely the feeling that a Jungle Dogs show leaves its fans with. Something about that calypso/reggae/ska sound just makes you feel good. Was it that way from the beginning for the Jungle Dogs?

From the beginning, we always wanted to make people happy. We wanted to be a group of guys that pleased people with our music. We started out thinking that we would be a Cajun band. Then we realized that we were playing too many chords and were too complex to be a Cajun band. Then, in the mid-eighties, this guy brought an album to us, a folk album from Jamaica. He said to check it out because we might like it. We put it on the turntable, and we screwed up. We put the speed on forty-five instead of thirty-three, and all these folks tunes from Jamaica were sped up. We were like, “This is really cool! We should do this!” and then we figured out what a mistake we’d made. But then we thought, “Keep with it, man. This is our future!” There you go. That was that. It was nothing anybody was doing. Nobody else was doing anything like it at the time. Call it luck or whatever, but we landed on it.

Do you remember that first gig you all played together officially as the Jungle Dogs?

I do. And when we played it, it was so much fun that even though we made absolutely no money, we were like, “That’s okay.” At the venue we played, they said they would either give us $300 or we could take eighty percent of the door. We said, “Screw it, let’s take eighty percent of the door.” We made $12 apiece. Everybody loved it, though. From that point on, it was over the top. We had a lot of fun from that point on.

The first Jungle Dogs concert was in 1988. In 2016, you are two years away from the thirtieth year of all of you playing music together. Is that hard to fathom for all of you?

Yes and no. When you get to be my age, you say that about a lot of things. We stopped ten years ago, and then started again six years ago. For every person in the band, life had changed so much. Children, jobs, everything. You blink your eyes and it feels like yesterday. Yet in some ways it feels like a million years ago. But that’s what’s great. At these shows you’ve got college kids hangin’ with people twice their age. I had a woman from Murphysboro tell me, probably four years ago, that at the end of the night she was dancing, and some college girl came up to her and said, “I wish my mom could be like you!”

That’s the most impressive part of these reunion shows is that you have layers of generations that are now coming out to enjoy the music. Is the atmosphere something you as a group have intended to cultivate, or would you attribute it to the feelings inspired by the music itself?

It’s absolutely the music. There is music that is intended for each generation, niche music that doesn’t make it after ten years or so. But calypso music, that infectious music and the rhythms that we play, seem to keep perpetuating themselves, all the way from Harry Belafonte all the way up to Bruno Mars. If you tap into that rhythm, you’ll find that it’s not in a time capsule. It spans such a long time period. That kind of groove is infectious, and you can’t put it down. Trends come and go, but I think that particular kind of music is just there for eternity.

What is it like to be a part of the musical brotherhood that is the Jungle Dogs, and has stood the test of time?

You put it on the back burner sometimes. But then, I’ll have a total stranger come up to me and mention the band. For me, that’s really heartwarming. I know, in my heart, as a Jungle Dog, my best days are over. I don’t pretend to be anything special. I mean, I’ve got a day job. But yet I know that we put such a timestamp on what we did. I’m always thinking, “Well, it’s surely got to stop somewhere.” But then every year, inevitably, I’ll have at least two or three people come up to me and mention a great memory. That is so humbling, because I know we made them happy, for at least one night. So many people spend their lives doing things that don’t make anyone happy. I’ve made happy, people I don’t even know. That makes a big difference to me. I’ll take that to my grave.

How do you see the future of The Jungle Dogs? Do you think it will continue for years to come?

[laughing] To be honest with you, I hope they will. But I will also tell everybody, in all honesty, if you really want to see the Jungle Dogs, by all means, come see us this weekend. Who knows for sure? Our drummer is moved out west, about halfway to Japan, so it’s getting more and more difficult to get everyone together. I definitely hope it will go on, but you just never know. We’re all getting up there in age. Who knows what next year will bring?

Do you have a favorite memory, or a gig that stands out?

There are so many, but I do have a very favorite. It was the year we actually got to play on the stage of the Du Quoin State Fair Grandstand. My father and mother and all my brothers and sisters-in-laws were there. It really meant a lot to me because my dad always kind of shook his head like, “Why is this kid trying to be a guitar player? I want him to be a banker or an accountant or something.” My father just passed away this year, but that gig stands out in my mind because he was just so proud of the band and what I was involved in. To see that ear-to-ear grin on my dad’s face was just huge for me. My dad came to see a few other gigs, but playing on the main stage at the state fair and seeing my dad with this look on his face that said, “Yeah my son was a little crazy with that guitar thing, but by god he made something out of it” was just huge.

What is your favorite song to play live on stage?

So many bands try to get serious about social issues or love, but without a doubt, the Jungle Dogs thing is about fun and humor, even when we try to get serious. There’s no doubt that “Cold Beer” is our anthem and I definitely enjoy playing it. But I really love “Be Careful What You Wish For.” That’s my favorite song that I’ve written. Probably my favorite song that the Jungle Dogs do that isn’t “Cold Beer” is “Why, Why,” that Dan Ward wrote. Those three are the strongest songs that I like to play, definitely.

If you were to issue an invitation to this weekend’s reunion concert, what would you say to our readers to get them to dig into their pockets for that cover charge and enjoy a night out with friends?

I would say come to a Jungle Dogs show because you will not see any local band in America doing this kind of upbeat music as good as we do it. There’s no doubt in my mind. Come out and see us!

who: Jungle Dogs reunion

what: funk, reggae, ska, calypso

where: Pinch Penny Pub Beer Garden / Copper Dragon Brewing Company

 

when: Saturday, September 3

Roots of a Rebellion: A Reggae Revolution Concludes the Sunset Concerts

Venues & Businesses
Sunset Concerts


Who: Roots of a Rebellion
What: Sunset Concert Series (reggae)
Where:
When: 2016-07-28
Roots of a Rebellion rock Thursday, July 28 on the Steps of Shryock Auditorium. The Nashville, Tenne
Leah Williams
Video Comentary

Roots of a Rebellion rock Thursday, July 28 on the Steps of Shryock Auditorium. The Nashville, Tennessee-based roots-reggae band is hot off the heels of releasing a new album, A Brother’s Instinct, which came out earlier this month.

Nightlife talked with guitarist and lead singer Austin Smith about the band’s rising status and making music that makes a difference.

Current members of Roots of a Rebellion include Smith, Marco Martinez, Adam Quellhorst, Troy Wiggins, Jeremyck Smith, and Justin Smith.

Roots of a Rebellion started gigging back in 2010. The band started as a cover band, covering blues and jam-rock tunes. Smith said their own sound evolved while they held on to their influences.

“We wanted something different, something that not only sounds good but makes you feel good,” Smith said. “And everybody brought their own ideas and influences to the table.”

For A Brother’s Instinct, Roots of a Rebellion rented a bed-and-breakfast in Boston and worked with Craig Welsch, a music producer who had previously collaborated with State Radio on 2012’s Rabbit Inn Rebellion. Then they poured their hearts into the new project.

“We lived and breathed the album for almost four days,” Smith said. “We worked almost nonstop, twelve hours a day.”

Smith said at the end of the production schedule, the band decided to head back to Music City after reports of a snowstorm, but they ended up finding themselves deep in snow anyway.

“The winter storm Jonas was coming, and we knew we wanted to get home before the storm hit,” Smith said. “So we drove all night just to get back just to get back for the largest snowstorm Nashville has ever seen. We were on the interstate in our beatup van going five miles per hour, passing all these cars along the highway. It was crazy.”

Smith said many tracks on the new album are already incorporated into the live shows. He said the purpose for the record was for audiences to get to know the band and get a sense of what the live performances were like.

“It’s really an opportunity to hear what we are about,” Smith said. “All the songs on the CD are ones we have toured with, only one is new and hasn’t been played out yet. We are constantly trying out new songs and writing, so we wanted to include all the ones that hit the hardest with the crowds and went over the best.”

Smith said much of the A Brother’s Instinct— and Roots of a Rebellion’s music in general— combines roots reggae with a message of love and respect for all of humankind.

“There is so much music out there that A, doesn’t sound good, or B, doesn’t have a good message,” Smith explained. “We want our music to bring out messages of peace and love and unity and respect for everyone, everywhere. Even if you disagree with someone, you can still respect them.”

Overall, the response for the album has been overwhelming, he said.

“We’ve had nothing but positive reception,” Smith said. “All of our fans have been really supportive. We just played a soldout show in our hometown, and it was just electric.”

Earlier this year, Roots of a Rebellion won the BMI Road to Bonnaroo competition, which occurred over several weeks at Nashville nightclub Mercy Lounge. As a result, they earned a spot at the massive festival. This summer will continue their Midwest tour, and Smith said this fall the band will head out west for shows in Colorado.

Smith said his biggest wish is for Roots of a Rebellion to deliver a message of hope that stirs action in the audience. A lot could change, he added, if the right people are motivated to make that change happen.

“My hashtag is, Your Life Matters,” he said. “Be the change you want to see in the world.”

For more information, check out <http://RootsOfARebellion.com>.

who: Roots of a Rebellion

what: Sunset Concert Series (reggae)

where: Steps of Shryock Auditorium

 

when: Thursday, July 28

Jungle Dogs Reunion 2015: Still Kicking the School Year off With a Real Party

Bands
Jungle Dogs

MP3's
Jungle Dogs

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Jungle Dogs

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Venues & Businesses
Copper Dragon, The
Pinch Penny Pub

More Articles
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2013: A Quarter Century of Music, Memories, and Fun
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2014: A Wild Carbondale Party Tradition Continues
Jungle Dogs Reunion Concert 2012: Together Again for a Party, Nostalgia, and Cold Beer
Jungle Dogs: Returning to Reopen Their Own Back Yard
Jungle Dogs: SIU’s Party-school Image Incarnate


Who: Jungle Dogs reunion show
What: party rock, funk, ska, reggae
Where:
When: 2015-09-05
In Carbondale, few traditions are as anticipated or as celebrated as the annual Jungle Dogs reunion
Jeff Hale
Video Comentary

In Carbondale, few traditions are as anticipated or as celebrated as the annual Jungle Dogs reunion concert on Labor Day weekend. Carbondale’s favorite party band will once again come together Saturday, September 5 in Pinch Penny Pub’s beer garden. The rain location is the Copper Dragon Brewing Company.

“We’re really looking forward to this,” Jungle Dogs trumpeter and legendary frontman and party master D. Ward tells Nightlife. “This is the fifth year in a row that we’ve done it. It’s so great to have the people down at Pinch Penny that let us do this every year. It’s gotten to the point where everybody just knows it’s going to happen, and sets this weekend aside and looks forward to it.”

Fans are looking forward to the appearance of a legend and legacy on the Carbondale music and party scene.

In 1987, this group came together to create an infectious and unforgettable blend of ska, pop, reggae, and jazz that soon became as much of a weekend staple on the Carbondale bar scene as cold beer and pizza by the slice. Almost every Friday or Saturday, huge audiences would seek out the club where the Dogs were playing, and the party that ensued would make Mardi Gras look like a quilting class.

The legend and legacy that is the Jungle Dogs continued throughout the 1990s, with new legions of fans flocking to concerts every year. The Carbondale experience was not complete without at least one Jungle Dogs concert, and countless graduates celebrated educational milestones to the band’s music.

The Jungle Dogs party train surged down the tracks until 2004, when growing families and diverse career paths prompted the group— saxophone player Klaus “Rock the House” Bank, bass player Eddie Chapa, trombone player Larry Daly, trumpet and keyboard player Keith Huffman, drummer John Hunter, percussionist Matt Linsin, trombone and keyboard player Jim Owens, guitarist Dan Schingel, and D. Ward— to cease live performing.

Fast forward six years to Labor Day weekend 2010 at Pinch Penny, and the band that rocked Carbondale for seventeen years came back better than ever. The Jungle Dogs reunited, not only with each other, but with the fans that had made them a household name in Southern Illinois— not to mention some of their fans’ children, and in some cases their grandchildren. After that night, there could be little question that the Jungle Dogs Labor Day reunion show had to become a yearly event.

Although the band now only plays together once a year, for Ward and the rest of the guys in the band, their love for the music and the idea of seeing generations of fans keeps them coming back to Pinch Penny year after year.

“Time goes by so fast,” Ward says. “It seems like we’ve slowed down a little bit. Obviously, we don’t play as much as we used to. I wish we could get to play a little bit more, but obviously circumstances don’t allow for that. Like they say, time flies when you’re having fun. But the show at Pinch is always a great time for us.”

Ward likens the infrequency of the Jungle Dogs’ reunions to the time before video, when The Wizard of Oz could only be seen on television once a year.

“I know that I always look forward to it,” he laughs. “I still get a little bit nervous before we go up there to play, but that always seems to go away. Back in the day, we were playing just about every weekend, or at least once or twice a month. Now, with the once-a-year thing, I think everybody does probably look a little more forward to it. But I always looked forward to playing no matter how often it was. I always appreciated being able to get up there with the boys and do our thing. It was always a great time.”

A great time is the name of the game for the Jungle Dogs and what they have delivered to their fans for almost thirty years. Ward says that although the city that was the group’s creative birthplace has undergone many metamorphoses, the band’s original mission has remained the same. This continues to keep their legions of original fans, and their flocks of new ones, coming to Pinch every Labor Day weekend.

“Carbondale has changed a lot since we started, as far as the number of clubs that have live music,” Ward says. “I don’t think there are nearly as many as there used to be. I would love to be able to come back and play a little bit more, or even be back on the road a little bit. The main thing we had, and the original idea from the very beginning, was the idea of having fun— to break down that wall between the band and the crowd. We just wanted to be creative and do our thing, and it is always about having a good time, us and the audience. We have tried to keep that tradition going for the past five years at Pinch. I guess if you’ve got a good thing like that going, you just try to keep it going. Even if it is only once a year.”

One cannot help but marvel at how almost three decades have elapsed since the Jungle Dogs first took to a Carbondale stage. Ward finds it hard to believe that the years have passed so quickly, but says that their music has remained ageless, and that for the Dogs, the fans remain the driving force behind their love for performing.

“It seems like a long time ago, and yet it doesn’t,” he muses. “But that’s the way with everything. It’s like life— it just goes by so fast. What a great run we’ve had.”

It may be impossible for anyone who came of age or went to college in Carbondale between 1987 and 2004 to believe that people in town today have not heard of the Jungle Dogs, but no doubt they exist and are looking fun. Ward says they should definitely consider making a stop at Pinch Penny, because what they will find is not just a concert, but a party that draws in generations with music that will just plain make people feel great.

“Every year,” Ward says, “we always start out with the older crowd, the ones that have followed us over the years. Some of them stay for the entire night, and that’s great. But as the night goes on, you start to see younger and younger faces. Last year I noticed there were a lot of young people that were seeing us for the first time. They really seemed to get into the spirit of it, and that’s just the way it happened with us when we were all that age thirty years ago. If a bunch of old guys like us can win over a young crowd like that, you know there’s got to be something fun that’s happening; something that everybody can enjoy.

“I would just like to say that they should come out and see something different,” Ward concludes. “It’s not going to be your every-night evening at Pinch. If you really want to kick the school year off with a real party, there’s no better band to do it with, still to this day, than the Jungle Dogs.”

Find out more at <http//www.JungleDogs.com>.

who: Jungle Dogs reunion show

what: party rock, funk, ska, reggae

where: Pinch Penny Pub Beer Garden / Copper Dragon Brewing Company

 

when: Saturday, September 5

Ark Band: Ain’t No Party Like the Sunset Finale

Venues & Businesses
Sunset Concerts

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Ark Band: Setting the Sun on the Sunset Concerts
Ark Band: Floating on a Flood of Reggae at the Sunset Concerts 2013


Who: Ark Band
What: Sunset Concerts (reggae)
Where:
When: 2015-07-30
All good things must come to an end, but at least the epitomic finale of the season’s concert series
Leah Williams
Video Comentary

All good things must come to an end, but at least the epitomic finale of the season’s concert series is setting up with a sizzling Caribbean sendoff that the summer deserves.

The Ark Band returns to the ‘Dale with a performance at the final Sunset Concert Thursday, July 30 on the Steps of Shryock Auditorium. The Colombia, Ohio-based group produces a high-energy show jam-packed with virtuoso musicianship. One listen and it is easy to understand why the band has been going strong for nearly thirty years with no signs of slowing down.

The Ark Band includes Terry Bobb on drums, Eustace Bobb on bass guitar, Mark Hunter on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Kohl Fixari and Tim Hartshorn as dual lead guitarists, and Qweku Menka on the keyboards.

Terry and Eustace Bobb— the Saint Lucian Riddim Twins— founded the band in 1987. That same year, Terry Bobb came to the States from the Caribbean.

The hard-working band has travelled across the United States, Canada, and Jamaica to share an explosive mix of roots-reggae, calypso, and soca styles inside a repertoire of original compositions and covers. These songs propagate love, peace, and togetherness along with with a sense of spirituality often lost in today’s world.

Keeping up the band’s heavy touring schedule has its advantages.

“We are basically a band on the run,” cofounder Terry Bobb said. “If it has music, we’ll be there playing.”

Bobb said the band is currently working on a fifth album. When the Ark Band is able to take a time out for studio recording, he said, the group attempts to make music that expresses their evolving perspectives and musical tastes.

“[The songs] are all different,” Bobb said. “And they all represent where the band is at a certain time, like a soundtrack.”

Bobb explained that the international appeal of reggae transcends personal preferences in the name of the universal mode— to mellow out. The heart of the matter finds truth in a pop song.

“It’s like that song, ‘All About that Bass,’” Bobb said, referencing the Meghan Trainor tune. “Reggae music is all about the bass and the drums.”

Other elements the Ark Band employs are intricate harmonies and the ability to share lead vocals. Bobb said many bands, like the Beatles and Fleetwood Mac, successfully play this type of vocal musical chairs because it keeps the music interesting and the audience engaged in what is going to happen next.

“We have three lead singers,” Bobb said, “and with that you have a different dynamic. We switch it up on you. With three different singers, you will see that the band speaks for itself. You can listen to a whole show and not get bored hearing the songs.”

No strangers to Southern Illinois, the Ark Band closed the 2013 Sunset Concert series and before that the 2009 series. The opportunity to once again close out the Sunset Concerts is an experience the band enjoys.

“We always look forward to coming back to Carbondale,” Bobb said. “We always have a good time when we come here.”

Bobb said that reggae also speaks to parts of the soul that like to get down, let loose, and have a good time. Musical preferences are set aside during an evening set to island sounds and party moods that audiences have relished summer after summer.

“They say that rock fans will go to rock shows,” Bobb said. “But reggae, it’s for everybody.”

For more information about the Ark Band, check out <http://www.TheArkBand.com>.

who: Ark Band

what: Sunset Concerts (reggae)

where: Steps of Shryock Auditorium

 

when: Thursday, July 30

Sunset Concerts 2015: UNRB: Collateral Jammage = So. Much. Fun.

Venues & Businesses
Sunset Concerts

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Sunset Concerts 2015: Horseshoes and Hand Grenades: Grounded in Roots, Soaring With Wings


Who: UNRB
What: Sunset Concerts (ska)
Where:
When: 2015-06-25
The next Sunset Concert band wants to provide the soundtrack to the summer mood you should already b
Leah Williams
Video Comentary

The next Sunset Concert band wants to provide the soundtrack to the summer mood you should already be enjoying.

Saint Petersburg’s UNRB rocks Thursday, June 25 at the Turley Park Gazebo as part of the long-standing summer series. The ska-fusion band from the Sunshine State mixes different genres to create a cocktail of mellowed-out, horn-tinged happy. Their latest EP, Collateral Jammage, just hit stores June 17.

For more information and UNRB, check out the band’s website at <http://www.unrbmusic.com>.

Nightlife recently chatted up the band’s lead singer and electric-ukulele  player, Noel Rochford, to find out more about making immediately danceable sounds from the most unconventional instruments, incorporating inside jokes into songs, and getting psyched for the group’s biggest tour to date.

Tell me a little bit about the band. How did you start and is your name initials for anything?

UNRB started in 2010 when [bassist] Nic [Giordano], [drummer] Eric [Allaire], and I were music students at Saint Petersburg College. We were studying jazz and classical music but wanted to play rock, so we started a band on the side for fun. Nic and I had played in a ska band together back in high school and I was still fascinated with the genre, so we found horn players on Craigslist and the band was born!

As for the name, it happened by accident— we needed a working title for the new project until we found the perfect name that defined our band’s sound and style. Nothing seemed to fit, so we ended up jokingly referring to ourselves as the “Untitled Noel Rochford Band”— and it stuck!

Your band incorporates a lot of unique instrumentation, like the electric ukulele and the horn section. How does it all come together to produce your sound? Your music is so fun-sounding.

We’ve been complimented a lot on the tightness of our arrangements, but we write that way because of our unconventional setup. The ukulele basically plays the guitar role in the band, being the only instrument capable of producing chords. But since it lacks low notes, we need the horns to fill in certain spots in the music, and the bass does extra work to compensate as well. The rhythm section locks in so well that it’s very comfortable to fit vocals and horn lines on top. Our goal is to have every instrument complement each other and blend well. With seven guys it’s very easy to do too much.

When you are writing songs and music, what sort of things inspire you?

Almost anything can become a song. Sometimes it’s based off of true stories— “FUBAR” from our first album and “The House on Lime Street” off our new EP are both pieces of band history set to music. Other times an inside joke turns into a song, like the title Collateral Jammage becoming reality. We never meant for that to happen.

Often one part of a song will hit me— the melody and lyrics for the chorus, or a chord progression, maybe just the title— and the rest of the song gets built around that one idea.

The great thing about thinking creatively is you never know what’s going to spark the next great idea. It could be a cup of coffee or a bulldozer or a lady walking down the street with six chihuahuas that are all wearing tiny sweaters.

You are coming up on an EP-release party later this month. What can we expect from this latest album?

So. Much. Fun. Collateral Jammage is the sound of a band that has figured itself out and is ready to share its sound with the world. Our first album was a trial by fire, so we walked into the studio this time with great songs and a wealth of knowledge about the recording process. We worked with great producers and tracked much of the album in groups, so you get the live energy of UNRB with a professional polish on top. I know people will love listening to this album because I love listening to this album. It’s high-energy dancing material that just screams “fun!” from beginning to end.

Ska had a heyday in the late nineties. Do you think it could make a mainstream comeback like that again?

Absolutely! Ska and reggae have had a hard time in the U.S. compared to other countries when it comes to popularity. It flares up for a few years at a time but doesn’t have much sustaining power on the radio. I’m noticing a change in that trend lately— lots of reggae bands have been getting on the radio and are only getting more popular instead of fading out. I think that bodes well for ska, too. Plus we incorporate many other elements and genres into our music, so ska isn’t a perfect definition for us. Our music is lively, upbeat, carefree, and practically begging you to crank up the volume and rock out like nobody’s watching. Who wouldn’t want to hear that on the radio?

What do you hope someone gets from coming to an UNRB show?

I hope someone who sees UNRB for the first time leaves our show with a reminder of why they fell in love with music in the first place. Everybody remembers that first album they fell completely in love with and couldn’t stop listening to. I still remember those live shows I went to that blew me away and reaffirmed my passion for music. I firmly believe a UNRB show will not only entertain you, but remind you of the effect that a great performance can have on you. We want people to lose themselves in the concert, to scream at the top of their lungs and pump their fists in the air. We want people to jump as high as they can and clap their hands and leave their reservations behind, if just for a few moments. We want to exhilarate people with our music. That’s what I hope someone takes away from a UNRB show— and a copy of our new EP wouldn’t hurt, either.

Is there anything else you would like to say?

I know that the whole band is over the moon about this tour— we’ve travelled around the southeast a bit and play Florida very heavily, but this is the biggest thing we’ve ever done by a long shot. I’ve never been to most of the states we’re playing, and I’ve definitely never played a six-thousand-seat auditorium overlooking Lake Michigan on the opening night of the world’s largest music festival.

When you put it together with the new EP, it marks the beginning of the next step for UNRB. We’re already planning big tours for 2016 and figuring out how to outdo ourselves on the next full-length album. When we get to SIU we’ll be riding a wave of positivity so big we won’t be able to help sharing it with you, onstage and off. If someone gets half as excited about what we’re doing as we are about the fact that we get to do it, then we want to meet you and give you a high-five.

UNRB is all about having fun, playing music and making friends— and I know we’ll be doing all three at the Sunset Concert Series.

who: UNRB

what: Sunset Concerts (ska)

where: Turley Park Gazebo

 

when: Thursday, June 25

Dan Barron: Aloha from Hawaii!

Venues & Businesses
Blue Sky Vineyard

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Dan Barron Trio: Melting Away Spring Stress With Hawaiian-inspired Tunes
Dan Barron Trio: Authentic Island Vibes


Who: Dan Barron
What: Hawaiian music
Where:
When: 2015-04-25
The Bonsai Pipeline comes to Little Egypt Saturday, April 25, when Blue Sky Vineyard and Winery hold
Chris Wissmann
Video Comentary

The Bonsai Pipeline comes to Little Egypt Saturday, April 25, when Blue Sky Vineyard and Winery holds the annual Hawaiian luau party.

Activities will include limbo and hula-hoop contests.

For cuisine, Blue Sky will fire up a pig roast, while entertainment will come from fire twirlers, tarot readers, and for the fourth year in a row, Carbondale-music alumnus Dan Barron.

Barron, originally from Chicago and now living in Fairfield, Ohio, spent a year playing music on Maui.

Living in Hawaii, Barron told Nightlife, was transformational.

“When I was in Chicago giving it a go at making music, I found it very disheartening,” Barron says. “Not many people appreciated original music, and it was hard to break into the scene there, so I decided to take a break.”

With a couple of suitcases and his guitar, Barron bought a one-way ticket to Maui. He moved into a house with fourteen other people, all of whom were looking to change their lives.

“That’s when I realized what was really important,” Barron says. “Music, as much as I loved it and enjoyed playing it, needed to be more of a hobby. What was really important was family, education, and helping other people.”

With this insight, Barron returned to the mainland. He spent some time in Florida, where he met his wife Aurora. The two then moved back to Chicago, where they married.

“I didn’t have a chance with her if I was the man I was in Chicago,” Barron says. “If anybody comes to my show and enjoys what I’m playing, look for my wife in the crowd and shake her hand and thank her, because if it wasn’t for her I probably wouldn’t still be playing music.”

The couple moved to Carbondale so Barron could work on a master degree in social work. While here, Barron recorded a CD, Amaranthine, and Aurora began booking shows for him on the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail. He was a natural to serve as Blue Sky’s luau musician.

“I loved the wineries,” Barron says of his life in Southern Illinois. “I love that they hire local musicians, and when people come to the wineries they appreciate original music. It was a really good experience.”

Barron says that his original music has been influenced by every place he lived. In Chicago, it was rock; in Hawaii, it was island music by the likes of Bob Marley and Jack Johnson; in Southern Illinois it was Americana and folk.

In the musical waters where Barron swims, the latter remains the strongest obvious current. With a voice that recalls Lyle Lovett, Barron lambasts greed in “Fall of Rome” and religious hypocrisy in “Believer in the Charade” (“Churches take more than they’re given / If the richest lot in town bears a cross on its brow then I believe in faith not religion”). “That [style] probably will stick with me forever,” he says.

But musically, Barron still loves to revisit the beaches and oceans of Maui. At the luau, expect songs by Marley, Johnson, and tropical arrangements of classic tunes like “Sitting on the Dock of the Bay.”

“What I’m playing at the luau is not a projection of what I write currently, but it’s fun and I enjoy playing it,” he says. “Coming back for this luau, I’ll probably do that every year. I have a lot of good memories there.”

who: Dan Barron

what: Hawaiian music

where: Blue Sky Vineyard and Winery

 

when: Saturday, April 25

Jungle Dogs Reunion 2014: A Wild Carbondale Party Tradition Continues

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Jungle Dogs

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Jungle Dogs

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Venues & Businesses
Copper Dragon, The
Pinch Penny Liquors

More Articles
Jungle Dogs Reunion 2013: A Quarter Century of Music, Memories, and Fun
Jungle Dogs Reunion Concert 2012: Together Again for a Party, Nostalgia, and Cold Beer
Jungle Dogs: Returning to Reopen Their Own Back Yard
Jungle Dogs: SIU’s Party-school Image Incarnate


Who: Jungle Dogs
What: party rock, funk, reggae, ska
Where:
When: 2014-08-30
Labor Day weekend is upon Southern Illinois once again, that time when people from across the region
Jeff Hale
Video Comentary

 

Labor Day weekend is upon Southern Illinois once again, that time when people from across the region make time for that one last blowout bash of the summer. For music fans in Carbondale, this means it is time once again for the annual Jungle Dogs reunion, which gets underway Saturday, August 30 in the Pinch Penny Pub beer garden. The rain location is in the Copper Dragon.

A Carbondale tradition since 2009, the Jungle Dogs reunion carries on a legacy that began in 1987, when a group of musicians, many of whom studied at the SIU School of Music, came together to create a trademark blend of infectious reggae, funk, ska, and urban pop. The Jungle Dogs— saxophone player Klaus “Rock the House” Bank, bass player Eddie Chapa, trombone player Larry Daly, trumpet and keyboard player Keith Huffman, drummer John Hunter, percussionist Matt Linsin, trombone and keyboard player Jim Owens, guitarist Dan Schingel, and trumpet player and frontman D. Ward— packed in crowds on stages across the Midwest until 2004, when changing job and family commitments compelled Carbondale’s favorite party band to retire. After that, the fun and good times that the band inspired during their reign as the region’s foremost live band were only a memory, to the bleak dismay of fans who followed the Dogs from stage to stage for sixteen years.

Five years later, with a desire to feel that on-stage camaraderie and the special magic of a live audience, the band came together once again on Labor Day weekend at Pinch. What happened on that mystical night in 2009 began a new tradition. For five years the Jungle Dogs reunion has attracted fans of all ages from all over the country, from those who first grooved to the band’s Caribbean-influenced sounds as college students to their children and even grandchildren who had only been exposed to the group’s signature sound via CD and aged cassettes and videos. Now, as Labor Day weekend approaches once again, the Jungle Dogs are preparing to relive old memories and help their loyal audiences create new ones.

Jungle Dogs bassist and original member Eddie Chapa tells Nightlife that the event is as much a reunion for the band as it is a chance for the group to connect and reconnect with old and new fans alike.

“It’s that time of year once again,” Chapa says. “We always start planning this thing eight or nine months ahead of time, and it seems like it’s going to be forever. Then, before you know it, the summer’s getting ready to be over and it’s right around the corner. We’re gearing up for our big preparty rehearsal the night before; that will be on Friday. That’s always a great time for us.”

After more than a quarter century of sold-out live shows and five years of reunion shows that continue to draw fans from multiple generations, one might wonder if the ongoing success of the Jungle Dogs ever amazes the men who have been making it happen in Carbondale since the late 1980s. Chapa confesses that it does.

“It always kind of surprises me,” he laughs, “especially with every year that passes by. Time marches on, you know, but people come up to me still. They always say they’re looking forward to the show, and they always make sure to ask me what time we’re starting. They always want to know if we’re starting early like we do every year. We always start early, because a lot of our older fans and close friends come early. People have already been buying T-shirts so they can wear them to the show; I’ve delivered some of them. It’s funny how it works. It’s almost like two shows built into one. Early on, it’s the older faces that we’ve seen for years and years. Then, later, the students start showing up, and it’s like a second wave. A lot of time the students will say, ‘Who are those old guys up on stage? Boy, they sure are a lot of fun.’ Then, they start partying right along with us.”

Though the Jungle Dogs reunion show has become a Labor Day tradition in Carbondale, another tradition, just as precious to the band members, is the annual preshow rehearsal, which Eddie Chapa always refers to as a party. Every year, on the night preceding the concert, the Jungle Dogs hold their own private reunion, which includes dinner, music, memories, and plenty of “Cold Beer.” One can almost hear the smile on Chapa’s face as he talks about the rekindling of that special Jungle Dogs brotherhood.

“I’ve said this before, but this is a reunion in a real sense,” Chapa says. “It’s a reunion for us as well. That’s the good stuff, because we get a chance to sit around and talk and hang out. A lot of times during a show, you’re up on stage and you’re playing and you’re busy. The night before is more personal. We share a meal together, we visit, we run through some tunes, and it’s equally as important to us. It makes for a whole reunion weekend.”

While the Jungle Dogs have been around Carbondale longer than many of their fans have been alive, the music and the memories created at each live show make for experiences that never seem to get old. The reunion show is particularly special to the Jungle Dogs themselves, who have never lost that passion for performing. Chapa credits that passion to the group members’ love for each other and the support of fans.

“We always look forward to this so much, mostly because it’s just the one show,” Chapa says. “It might be different if there were several shows built in throughout the year. It’s never really gotten old. Plus, I think a lot of it has to do with the dynamic of the band. It’s just so diverse, with all the different personalities. It’s like a big fraternity, not like these bands where it’s just three or four pieces. There’s nine of us at these reunions. It’s such a special event with such build up and anticipation for it. What do they call it when the planets align and it’s just one moment? It’s just fantastic every time, because we get to play all this great music and have all this fun. There’s just so many fun things. When you’re playing that music together, once you’re in that moment and you’re on stage, it’s almost an out-of-body experience. You raise the level, and you always appreciate that moment and the musical high. You see people smiling and dancing, and it’s just such an enjoyable moment.”

With twenty-six years having passed, Chapa makes no firm commitments about the notion of a brand new Jungle Dogs record, but tells Nightlife that the idea has been proposed and it’s an idea that is appealing— maybe for the band’s thirtieth reunion.

“Gosh, that is just crazy to think of three decades of Jungle Dogs,” Chapa says. “It always boggles my mind to think of how much time has lapsed. We have thought of new recordings. It seems like D. Ward is always instrumental in those conversations; it comes up every so often. He’s mentioned it to me a couple of times, and talked about new musical ideas. I would love nothing more than to be able to go back into the studio, even if it’s just to record one song. Anymore, in this day and age, with the single and the ninety-nine-cent download, people have kind of gotten away from the notion of a whole CD. But I would love to be able to record some new music. We’ve talked about it, and it’s not out of the realm of possibility.”

Chapa says that fans should not let any oppressive, late-summer heat dissuade them from coming out and enjoying another night of music, memories, and high spirits.

“We will definitely be on the stage at nine o’clock sharp,” he laughs. “We place a lot of importance on starting early. If you want to come and see a live band that likes to have fun and plays great music that is pretty diverse, come on out. The common denominator is fun— it’s all fun. It’s uplifting, positive music, with a festival-type band in a summer setting. Whether you’re seeing us for the first time or the hundredth time, it’s always enjoyable for everybody across the board. That’s the thing that makes Jungle Dogs so great. It’s just pure fun.”

For more about the Jungle Dogs, visit <http://www.JungleDogs.com>.

who: Jungle Dogs

what: party rock, funk, reggae, ska

where: Pinch Penny Pub Beer Garden / Copper Dragon Brewing Company

when: Saturday, August 30

 

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