Four shows in three days for the Tennessee Warblers

Four shows in three days for the Tennessee Warblers

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The self-proclaimed Americana band will have four shows in the area in three days starting at 10 p.m
Dustin Duncan

The Tennessee Warblers will be busy this weekend in Southern Illinois.

The self-proclaimed Americana band will have four shows in the area in three days starting at 10 p.m. on Friday night at Tres Hombres in Carbondale.

Adam Dalton, vocals and guitar, said the band plays some bluegrass, but isn’t a bluegrass band. They play a good mix of folk songs and things they enjoy. He said the Warblers have played tons of bluegrass brunches in Nashville for several hours at a time, so there is a good mix of tunes for them to choose.

“We mix in original tunes and covers of the things we like Bob Dylan, Grateful Dead and old folk songs,” he said.

Although the band originated in Nashville, there are Southern Illinois connections all throughout the group. John Beck, vocals and mandolin, is from Carbondale and was a member of Americana trio County Line. Also, Dalton’s wife is a graduate of Southern Illinois University.

“There are a lot of Southern Illinois people in Nashville and they kind of group together,” Dalton said. “We have played at PK’s and Tres before, so, we figured we would make a weekend out of it.”

The Warblers got started when Dalton hooked up with Beck in Nashville to collaborate. Knowing each other from the Nashville music scene, the two got together to get the creative juices flowing again.

“To kind of cure our writer’s drought so to say,” Dalton said.

The rest of the band formed when Dean Marold, upright bass, joined the band after playing with Dalton on other projects and Charles Butler on banjo and dobro joined the mix to complete the foursome.

On Saturday, the Tennessee Warblers will be at Alto Vineyards from 1 to 5 p.m., and then make their way to PK’s for a set at night. On Sunday at 2 p.m., the band will close out its Southern Illinois tour with a stop at Molly’s Pint in Murphysboro.

Dalton said the band enjoys coming to Southern Illinois because people actually listen to the music here.

“That is one thing we get spoiled of down here (Nashville),” he said. “There is so much music, but not many people are actually paying attention. To have people actually listening and be active, it is a lot better.”